Monday, April 16, 2012

N is for Neverland




Is it Neverland or Never Neverland?  My daughter just said she thought it was the Netherlands!  I haven't read Peter Pan or seen the Disney movie in years - but I'm sure it's not set in the Netherlands.

The story of Peter Pan is probably the first story that made me want to be a writer, to create worlds that are whatever I want them to be. 

It also opened my eyes at an early age (maybe five) to gender bias in literature and movies.  It's totally unfair that there were no lost girls, only lost boys. 

Wendy was characterized as a little mother, nothing more.  Tinkerbell to some degree was characterized as a jealous wife or girlfriend.  The little girls were made to grow up, but the boys never had too.  It was too hard for them.  Come on, give me a break. 

It is wrong or maybe too easy that all Tinkerbell wanted to do was hang out with a boy that didn't really even pay much attention to her.  Couldn't she do something more important with her awesome magical powers?



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This post is part of the 2012 A to Z Challenge

19 comments:

  1. Tinkerbell should have zapped him into reality.

    Good post! I couldn't agree more with you.

    I'm really enjoying your posts. Sorry about not getting over every day. THis seems to be the Challenge for me. It's never about what I'm going to post. How about you?

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    1. I totally agree. I don't think it's possible for me to keep up. Just doing my best.

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  2. But boys never really do grow up, do we?

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    1. Nope, and the women can't help but take care of them.

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  3. I was just gonna comment what Alex already said lol.....they sure never do!

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  4. I haven't read Peter Pan in years, but have to admit to having a HUGE childhood crush on him. Never even thought about this when I was young, but you're totally right. The women/girls were horribly portrayed throughout the story.

    Agree with Alex though, having grown up, this seems even MORE true to life. I have a toddler and husband at home and often times, they act the same age. :)

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  5. You have to watch the Johnny Depp movie, Finding Neverland. Makes me cry every time.

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    1. I haven't seen it. Maybe this weekend - after I'm done taking care of everyone else. :/

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  6. When I was a kid, my parents bought me a VHS of the Peter Pan broadway production with Mary Martin. I remember watching that movie over and over again in typical little kid fashion. I loved it so much. Then the Robin Williams movie Hook came out and I had something else to obsess over. I think my love for Peter Pan as a child may have laid the foundation for my attraction to Fantasy as an adult, as a reader and a writer.

    Nice post!

    J.W. Alden

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  7. I still enjoy movies that have anything to do with magic.

    I get your points though - hoping future movies and life will reflect a difference.

    http://bettyalark.blogspot.com/

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  8. "The only difference between men and boys is the price of their toys..." ;^)

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  9. the above comment--so true--even if they don't possess the toys

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  10. I agree with LG, I LOVE Finding Neverland. One of my favorite movies ever.

    I really never thought about it with Peter Pan but you're totally right about the gender bias.

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  11. Very interesting...I had never made the connection in the gender bias. Wow! Thank you for making me think.

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  12. I hear you on the gender bias. Now it seems to be the other way. All the stories are about girls ... most. Not a bad thing though. I think that's why I gravitated to Pippi Longstocking so much.

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  13. Times have changed. I'm sure Tinkerbell would be in charge in today's version. *wink*

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  14. I never thought about it before but it is worth thinking about.. what ever their age do men ever grow up as Chris puts it with the difference being the 'price of their toys' Girls generally seem to be conditioned into taking on the caring role, having dollies in push chairs and changing nappies where the boys usually get to do the exciting stuff...food for thought:) Amanda

    Amanda - Realityarts-Creativity
    Art Blog

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